IEREK Blog

Overlooked Climate Solution: Biochar from Crop Waste Could Make a Difference

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As the world continues to grapple with the devastating effects of climate change, there is growing recognition of the need for urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. While significant efforts have been made to transition to renewable energy and reduce emissions from industrial sources, there is another potential solution that has been largely overlooked.

Scientists have recently highlighted a promising solution to combat climate change that has been consistently overlooked by global policymakers. The solution involves the use of carbon sequestration from crop waste biochar made by poor smallholders in the developing world. By providing low-cost, low-tech biochar-making equipment to these farmers, who have limited access to biomass resources on rough terrain, the study suggests that we could significantly reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) and PM2.5 emissions. This approach has the potential to not only mitigate climate change but also generate additional income streams for poor farmers. The potential benefits of biochar from crop waste are significant and could play an important role in the global effort to combat climate change.

 Intriguingly, addressing climate change will require large-scale changes in human behaviour. However, trying to enforce sweeping social changes often meets resistance. An alternative approach could focus on appealing to individuals’ private motivations, like envy or pride. If designed thoughtfully, a system tapping into personal drivers could become self-perpetuating as people see their peers reaping benefits. Such an approach may prove more effective than top-down mandates. Additionally, it could empower developing communities by improving their livelihoods from the ground up. By creatively tapping into human nature and self-interest, we may find a path to tackling global issues while also lifting up marginalized groups.

  Global policy, policymakers and government representatives in the OECD countries routinely ignore the potential role to be played by carbon sequestration from crop waste biochar made by poor smallholders in the developing world.”

While empowering smallholders with biochar-making equipment is promising, certain barriers need to be addressed. Financial constraints may hinder the initial adoption of this technology, necessitating collaboration between governments, international organizations, and NGOs to provide financial support and incentives. Furthermore, education and capacity-building initiatives are vital to ensuring farmers understand the process and benefits of biochar production and application.

You have got to check out this paper; it provides the proof and lays out exactly how biochar can move the needle on global warming. And highlights this untapped potential and the power of grassroots climate action.

You have got to check out this paper -it provides the proof and lays out exactly how biochar can move the needle on global warming.  And highlights this untapped potential is brought to light and  the power of grassroots climate action. 

Visit us on IEREK Press Journals, which published numerous papers, this topic has been discussed in Mr. Michael Shafer’s paper, titled “Whose Carbon Capture? A bit of good news” in Environmental Science and Sustainable Development journal (ESSD).

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