10 Main countries driving the world in solar energy

solar energy

In a world that is ravenous for energy yet progressively careful about the harm that creating force can do, solar energy may very well be the answer: clean energy that is modest and practically interminable.

Positioning the main 10 countries with the most solar force limit is an approach to see who’s doing it best, and who could improve.

The numbers originate from the International Energy Agency’s Trends in Photovoltaic Applications report, keeping in mind they just experience 2014, it’s the latest information accessible. (These numbers let us know who is creating the crudest force from solar, not who is giving the best rate of their country’s energy with solar. What’s more, they show who has the best limit introduced to convey solar energy, not how much solar energy is really being delivered.)

What’s astonishing about this rundown is that generally modest countries are on it. Germany, Japan, Italy — they all rank higher than the US, despite the fact that we have considerably more land.

Solar force, until further notice, at any rate, requires a great deal of space. So for little countries to be driving the path in general limit is great.

What’s more, it shows the amount of chance there is to introduce more solar in spots that have a considerable measure of open area, similar to the US.

Here are the main 10 countries driving the world in solar energy:

  1. South Korea: 2,398 Megawatts
  2. Belgium: 3,156 Megawatts
  3. Australia: 4,130 Megawatts
  4. Spain: 5,376 Megawatts
  5. France: 5,678 Megawatts
  6. United States: 18,317 Megawatts
  7. Italy: 18,622 Megawatts
  8. Japan: 23,409 Megawatts
  9. China: 28,330 Megawatts
  10. Germany: 38,250 Megawatts