What is Biotechnology?

Biotechnology, in all of its forms, has thrived since prehistoric times. When the first human beings discovered that they could plant their own crops and breed their own animals, they learned to use biotechnology.
They have discovered several things such as: that milk could be converted into cheese or yogurt or that they could ferment fruit juice into wine.
When the first bakers found that they could make a soft, spongy bread rather than a firm, thin cracker, they considered themselves as biotechnologists.

Still, what is biotechnology? The concept brings different definitions to mind. Some are of developing new types of animals. Others dream of almost limitless sources of human therapeutic drugs. While others envisage the possibility of growing crops that a much more nutritious and naturally pest-resistant to feed an expeditiously increasing world population.

In its most absolute form, the term “biotechnology” attributes to the use of living organisms or their products to alter human health and the human environment. Prehistoric biotechnologists performed this as to ferment alcoholic beverages and as they used yeast cells to rear bread dough, and bacterial to make yogurts and cheeses; also as they bred their vigorous, productive Animalia to make even more vigorous and much more productive offspring.

Throughout human history, we have discovered loads of information about the different organisms that our ancestors used so efficaciously. That helped us increase our understanding of these organisms and how their cell products give us the ability to manage the many functions of numerous organisms and cells.
Several of discovered processes have helped us and help our everyday needs. For example, we can cause bacterial cells to produce human molecules, have cows produce more milk for the same amount that they are fed, and we can blend together therapeutic molecules that have never existed before.